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Sammy Hagar: Losing Respect For a Hero

David Lee Roth and Eddie Van Halen - 2012

In late 2011, Van Halen announced a new full-length album with former singer David Lee Roth was on the horizon for early 2012, finally putting an end to the often-agonizing wait for long time fans of the band. Depending on which school of thought you come from as an appreciator of Van Halen, you have either been waiting sixteen, fourteen or eight years for new material from your favorite band (Roth last recorded songs with the band in 1996, the last full length album was released in 1998 and Hagar last took the mic in 2004). Personally, I’m a rare breed of Van Halen fan, appreciating all eras and albums in their own way. I never got into the Roth vs. Hagar argument – I saw them as two different bands, each with some really excellent material. Plus, I liked the Gary Cherone-fronted Van Halen 3, unlike just about most of planet Earth. Additionally, I enjoyed the solo output of both post-Van Halen Roth and Hagar, even during their shakiest moments. In short, I am a fan of this band and all its current and former members. Well, at least until recently, that is.

Since Van Halen announced their intention to release new material with David Lee Roth, a seemingly scorned Sammy Hagar has done nothing but open his mouth and spew his opinion in the press, tarnishing his reputation as a laid-back, party-loving rocker in the process. In most cases, I have zero problem with somebody expressing their thoughts on a subject they have been close to at one time or another. After all, it seems logical for Sammy Hagar to hold an opinion on the current state of Van Halen, given the fact that he fronted the band for a number of years. The trouble is that Hagar has done nothing but speak in contradiction and fuzzy truths to make himself and his current project (the supergroup Chickenfoot) look like the better option. I suppose nobody told Sammy that nobody is required to choose one over the other.

Sammy Hagar

When Van Halen announced this past November that they had signed with Interscope Records to release their new album is when Hagar first chimed in. When asked by Rolling Stone magazine what his thoughts were regarding the signing and subsequent album, Hagar answered, “How long has it been since they did a record?  And that last one doesn’t count.” Clearly, Sammy isn’t a fan of Van Halen 3, which is no bold stance considering its large commercial and critical failure. But unlike the general public, Hagar has shared a stage with Cherone. During Boston stop on the the joint Hagar/Roth tour in 2002, Hagar had Cherone join himself and former Van Halen bassist Michael Anthony to perform two Van Halen hits, “Dreams” and “When It’s Love.” Hagar’s introduction to Cherone that evening? “I can’t sing this…ladies and gentlemen, local homeboy, Gary Cherone.” So, if Cherone wasn’t good enough to front Van Halen and you suggest his time in the band should be forgotten, why have him participate in your live show and perform Van Halen songs you admittedly can’t sing any longer? And what’s more, Hagar included the performances from that night on his 2003 live release, Hallelujah!

If that wasn’t enough to illustrate how Sammy Hagar might be somewhat disingenuous, he has continued to insert his foot firmly in his mouth in the press since. When music website Radio Metal asked the singer what he thought of the new Van Halen album A Different Kind of Truth upon its release in February 2012, Hagar had this to say: What I’ve heard so far, I wasn’t impressed with at all, personally…I think they chose to take the easy route and take some of their old stuff and and re-record it instead of writing new songs.” Now, by the band’s own admission, some of the songs on Truth were reworkings of those that appeared on their 1976 and 1977 demo tapes, prior to the release of their first album, Van Halen, in 1978. In most cases (illustrated by listening to said demos) the original music is slightly rearranged and Roth’s lyrics and melodies are almost entirely new. But this practice was only used on six of the thirteen new songs, or fewer than half. The others are completely new songs, which negates Hagar’s statement that the band did not write any new material.

While we’re on the subject of reusing old material, let’s take a look at Hagar’s 2008 solo release, Cosmic Universal Fashion. Three of that album’s ten songs (“Cosmic Universal Fashion,” “Psycho Vertigo” and “Peephole”) were previously recorded and shelved for years, presumably having not made the cut for any of his other records. The final track on the album is “Dreams/Cabo Wabo,” a medley of two Van Halen hits recorded live in concert. Also included is a rote cover of The Beastie Boys’ 1987 success, “Fight For Your Right To Party.” So, out of ten songs, five of them were actually written by Hagar for this particular release. Now, I’m not the best at mathematics, but Hagar seems to be phoning it in at a slightly higher percentage rate than he claims Van Halen is. I suppose, then, the statement that followed applied to himself just as much as he suggests it does for Van Halen: To me it makes a strange statement. It kind of says, ‘We don’t have anything, we’re not a band anymore, we’re not creative.’ Isn’t it a strange statement to you?” It certainly is, Sam. And it also shines a very bright light on why Cosmic was your last solo release before you formed a new band, Chickenfoot, in 2009.

Chickenfoot - 2011

Speaking of Chickenfoot (the supergroup featuring Hagar, Michael Anthony, guitar whiz Joe Satriani and Chili Pepper Chad Smith), Hagar felt the need to compare his new band to his former band in yet another public forum. While speaking with Ultimate Classic Rock, Hagar let this little gem make it to press: “If you take Joe versus Eddie, you take Dave versus me, Wolfie versus Mikey, Chad or Kenny versus Al… I mean, come on! You know what I mean? Man for man, who can sing the best? Dave or I, today? Who can play the best? Joe or Eddie, today? Who could play or sing the best? Wolfie or Mikey?” Okay, so Sam’s proud of his new band. And he should be, too. Chickenfoot has released two excellent records thus far and have given alot of rock band’s a run for their money in terms of music quality. But if you take a second to think about it, Hagar is essentially doing to Van Halen the same thing he bemoaned David Lee Roth for doing back in the late 80s, when Roth would compare his then-new solo band (featuring another guitar whiz, Steve Vai) to his former band, the Hagar-fronted Van Halen. That’s right…Hagar is currently doing the very thing he bitched about David Lee Roth doing back in 1986. How’s that for integrity and consistency?

If his most recent statements regarding the current state of his former band aren’t enough to demonstrate Hagar’s penchant for hypocrisy, more evidence can be found in his version of what happened before, during and after the ill-fated 2004 Van Halen reunion tour. By all accounts, Eddie Van Halen was in really bad shape during that tour, allegedly behaving in a very abusive manner and turning in mediocre performances due to his excessive drinking. Hagar would later recount the events of the tour in his 2011 autobiography, “Red: My Uncensored Life In Rock,” where the contradictions are abound. First, his statements about meeting with Eddie to attempt to bury the hatchet and get the band back out on the road: “I had been waiting at 5150 studios for more than an hour when Eddie finally showed up. I hadn’t seen him in a decade. He looked like he hadn’t bathed in a week. He certainly hadn’t changed his clothes in at least that long. He wasn’t wearing a shirt. He had a giant overcoat and army pants, tattered and ripped at the cuffs, held up with a piece of rope. I’d never seen him so skinny in my life. He was missing a number of teeth and the ones he had left were black. His boots were so worn out he had gaffer’s tape wrapped around them, and his big toe stuck out.” So Eddie turns up to your first meeting looking like a homeless junkie and you still entertained going out on tour with him? He justifies it like this: “This was Eddie Van Halen, one of the sweetest guys I ever met. He had turned into the weirdest fuck I’d ever seen, crude, rude and unkempt. I should have walked, but Eddie’s got a very charming, cunning side to him, where you feel like he’s got a good heart. He’s going to come through. He’s going to clean up and we’re going to get this thing done.” Okay, fair enough. Eddie is clearly in no shape to tour, but your past experience leads you to think he’s going to pull it together. Fair enough, Sam. You worked with him for years, you know him better than most.

Van Halen - 2004

Benefit of the doubt provided, let’s see what unfolded following that first meeting: “Our new manager, Irving Azoff, agreed to hold an intervention with Eddie. He brought a big, beefy security guard and met Al and me at 5150. Eddie walked in, carrying his wine bottle. Irving did all the talking. He told Eddie the tour was going to be difficult, that he needed to go away for a week or two, that we could postpone some dates if we needed. We all agreed Eddie needed to clean up.” Again, fair enough, Sam. You saw there was a problem and attempted to address it. Clearly, Eddie was in no shape to tour unless he went to rehab for a little while. Seems straightforward enough – no rehab, no tour, right?

Let’s check back in with Hagar: “From the start of the tour, Eddie made some terrible mistakes and it seemed like he couldn’t remember the songs. He would just hit the whammy bar and go wheedle-wheedle-whee.” Okay, so clearly Ed wasn’t up to it from the first night. If a man who has a reputation for his guitar playing and consistent performance quality comes onstage the first night playing poorly and acting strangely, something might be seriously up. Perhaps you should have pulled the plug then and tried harder to intervene and save a guy that you profess was once such a good friend and a genuinely nice guy. But no, instead: “They kept us apart as much as they could. We flew in different jets. We stayed at different hotels. We had our own limos. They had their bodyguards. Mike and I had ours. I stayed in my own dressing room on the other side of the hall. The only time I saw that guy was when we stepped out onstage.” Excellent…so instead of getting Ed off the road and into rehab, you soldiered ahead and had zero interaction with the guy except for when you went onstage. You couldn’t stand the guy, yet you performed with him every night. And you question the motives of the current Van Halen camp? Seems like you were in it for the money just as much as you suggest they are now.

I could continue on for quite a while longer pointing out the hypocrisy of the latter day Sammy Hagar, but it honestly brings this longtime fan alot of sadness. I always thought Sam was a real stand-up kind of guy and made sure to buy all of his post-Van Halen solo records to show him support for all the great years of music he afforded me while he was in the band. And for the most part, I really liked his post-Van Halen material. But from now on, I will always have a shade of utter disappointment whenever I hear or read anything about Sammy Hagar from this point forward. For a guy that regards himself as such a fan-friendly guy, he certainly let this one down considerably.

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February 23, 2012 Posted by | Blues, Cabo Wabo, classic rock, Guitar, Guitars, Mexico, Rock, Sammy Hagar, Uncategorized, Van Halen | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Unwrite These Songs

lynyrdskynyrdnewLynyrd Skynyrd – God and Guns
September 29, 2009
Roadrunner Records

Victim of Loudness War? Yes

Listening to Lynyrd Skynyrd’s latest release, God and Guns, it’s hard to fathom how the band strayed so far from their original (and far superior) sound. Gone are the down-home grooves and simple-yet-brilliant lyrical themes present on the band’s classic material, the songs that built their legend and remain endeared by the masses since their debut over three decades prior. What remains are trite rockers and forced ballads, reminiscent of much of the country-pop scene that is dominating the Billboard charts as of late. The bulk of Lynyrd Skynyrd’s current recordings are nothing but throwaways, nothing more than an obvious cash grab wrapped in an effort to keep the present day lineup and its name on tour and raking in the dough. Continue reading

October 1, 2009 Posted by | Blues, classic rock, Guitar, Guitars, Rock, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Thorogood’s Career Jammer

thorogoodnewGeorge Thorogood & the Destroyers – The Dirty Dozen
July 28, 2009
Capitol Records

Victim of Loudness War? No

George Thorogood and the Destroyers have always been about having fun with their music. Their sound is reminiscent of any bar band worth its salt and their best songs have always had plenty of hooks and sing-along moments to keep energy levels at their peak. This, partnered with Thorogood’s superb slide guitar playing, is no doubt what made them such an instant hit when they first appeared in 1977 and enabled them to maintain steady in-concert popularity through the present day.

The trouble with the group’s latest release, The Dirty Dozen, is that throughout the course of its twelve tracks, there never seems to be any reason for having released it. Granted, six of the tracks included here were previously released over the last three decades, but the other six tracks are newly recorded and presented for the first time on The Dirty Dozen. But all twelve of the tracks really serve no purpose as they add absolutely nothing to the band’s already vast catalog. These are twelve new blues covers, none of which match the quality or performance level of Thorogood and Co.’s previous successes. Continue reading

August 31, 2009 Posted by | Blues, classic rock, Guitar, Guitars, Rock, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Collective Soul Just Can’t Shine

a92351c88da02eda51f53210.LCollective Soul – Collective Soul (Rabbit)
August 25, 2009
Roadrunner Records

Victim of Loudness War? Yes

Collective Soul initially captured the attention of rock fans worldwide with their massive 1993 hit, “Shine,” a catchy mid-tempo track that called upon all the best characteristics of 1970’s rock to produce an undeniable winner. The track was included on the band’s debut, Hints, Allegations and Things Left Unsaid, which featured more of the same kind of music and catapulted the band into mainstream popularity. It wasn’t until the band’s sophomore release, 1995’s Collective Soul, that the band truly came into their own as they unleashed four chart-topping hits and secured themselves as a viable force in rock music.

The thing that was instantly apparent about a Collective Soul album was that it was a place to store four or five songs intended for single release with four or five other songs that could only be deemed as filler. But this was generally okay, considering the songs they had to offer as singles were unmistakably catchy, containing solid riffs and arena-ready choruses that almost defied the listener not to like them. Thus, it was easy to overlook the duds that surrounded them on the album, as the singles were more than enough to make the purchase price seem worth laying out. Continue reading

August 25, 2009 Posted by | classic rock, Guitar, Guitars, Rock, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Switch On This Moment

oriordanDolores O’Riordan – No Baggage
August 25, 2009
Zoe Records

Victim of Loudness War? Yes

Looking back on the alternative music movement of the early ‘90s, very few of the artists and bands that were so highly regarded at the time can still be put on the same pedestal a decade or more removed. Most of the material comes off sounding extremely dated and the reputations didn’t last much past all the hype. Singer/songwriter Dolores O’Riordan, former leader of Irish band The Cranberries, is one artist that survives the aforementioned process, remaining a dynamic and vibrant singer and songwriter years after her first appearance in 1993. Her former band may have fallen by the wayside had it not been for the dual ferocity and subtlety that her performance style brought to the table, leaving them amongst the few ‘90s acts that still retains their merit. Continue reading

August 24, 2009 Posted by | classic rock, Guitar, Guitars, Rock | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment